There is no doubt our baby has grown in bulk, put on weight. By now, as New Scientist lists in an article, 80 successful missions have been launched to the moon, one to Mercury, 40 to Venus, 38 to Mars, eight to Jupiter, four to Saturn, one each to Uranus and Neptune, and a pioneering craft is on its way to Pluto. There have been missions to asteroids and comets, and hundreds of satellites of all sizes are circling the earth. In terms of the total tonnage of satellites in orbit, there are about 1,200 ordinary buses circling the earth right now.

… not much has come out of these multi-billion trips into space and to other planets. As, according to one estimate, a single such trip costs more than the combined annual budgets of the 100 poorest nations of a world suffering from malnutrition, illiteracy and war, it is not surprising that some people find the whole exercise a bit nauseating.

Read the article†titled the “greying of space age”, which appeared in the Hindu magazine this Sunday.

Aren’t such space projects a wastage of our resources? It’s†romantic to say that we are exploring space and learning about our universe, but the amount of resources spent on such missions is gigantic, and is it really justifiable?